Roger Zelazny and Me: Talking the Literary Canon at Backspace

confhotelmay I attended the Backspace Writer’s Conference last weekend (it was my birthday present, actually). Wow, what a ride. Three days of workshops packed with info on what literary agents really want (no, really); how a book idea becomes a movie (it’s not how you might think); inspiring words from YA author A.S. King (One truly cool chick, go check her out. Like, right now. I’ll wait.); and choreographing fight scenes with thriller author Jonathan Maberry (holy crap, I didn’t know you could break someone’s elbow with two fingers!). All culminating in the equivalent of Writers’ Church with superagent Donald Maass talking about his writing how-to: 21st Century Fiction (props to Vanessa Lillie for coining the term 🙂 ). Lots of take aways, lots of work up ahead for me, but the best part was that I got to indulge one of my all-time passions: talking about books and favorite authors with people who love books and authors.bryantparkmay

In an evening conversation with Ted Boone, aspiring Science Fiction writer, I related an event that sticks out in my mind as formative regarding my notions of novelists and what they do. I don’t read SF these days (and I definitely don’t write it–never say never) but I have read it in the past and here’s why: When I was a young kid looking to sell Girl Scout cookies, my mom took me up to Stagecoach Drive in Santa Fe, which was potentially a brilliant sales strategy because Stagecoach Drive is Santa Fe’s equivalent of Newport, RI’s Bellevue Avenue. I don’t remember if I sold a lot of cookies–I think we were a bit stymied by the gated driveways–but the key to our trip was Mom’s acquaintance with Judy Zelazny, Roger Zelazny’s then wife. Roger Zelazny, for those of you who don’t know, was the prolific and award-winning author of classic Science Fiction and Fantasy novels. His oeuvre spanned the “Golden Years” of SF/F from about 1962 into the 1990s. He died in 1995. He was particularly known for his Amber series and for elevating pure genre fiction to something more literary. George R.R. Martin (of Game of Thrones fame and another Santa Fe resident) counts Zelazny as an inspiration for his own work.NinePrincesInAmber500

At any rate, Mrs. Zelazny selected a flattering number of my boxes of cookies, and while I was counting out change, she asked if I might like to see where her husband worked. I had no notion at the time that I was entering the workspace of a renowned novelist. I did know Roger Zelazny wrote books because his name was on the paperbacks my brother read non-stop in those days. As I remember the moment (which may bear only a little resemblance to ground truth) we walked down a few sets of stairs, like we were going underground. We got to a set of huge doors, where Mrs. Zelazny knocked. Upon receiving the call to enter, the doors parted like the gates of Mordor, and we entered a place of literary dreams. The Author, ensconced in the middle of floor to ceiling shelves holding books and Hugo awards, turned from his typewriter to greet us politely and a bit distractedly. I think he may have even signed a book or two for my brother. This is a sacred image for me, and no matter how many books I sell in the future (I hoping it will be many!), I don’t think I will count myself a success until I have an equivalent book-lined room of my own.

So thanks to Ted for reminding me of that formative experience. And thanks to Roger Zelazny for opening those doors so I could glimpse the writer at work and dream.

So what are your formative experiences about people in their workplaces? Did you visit a fire station as a kid? See the Marines at 8th and I? Anyone a Roger Zelazny fan?

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5 thoughts on “Roger Zelazny and Me: Talking the Literary Canon at Backspace

  1. Kecia it was fun to read your thoughts about the conference. I’m chuckling over Zelazny’s gates of Mordor. I think my idea of a defined work space came from my dad, who escaped to his study to get desk work done at home. (He also had a workshop in the basement, which was the base of operations for all of his home improvement projects, but that’s a different story.) Everything was neat and organized (he is a meticulous man who was working as a mechanical engineer at the time.) My home office is more disheveled. I keep thinking that his genes should kick in any day now and my organizational skills will finally rise to his level. To that end I’ve brought in filing cabinets and more shelves, but my stuff is still strewn around the room.

    • Kecia Adams says:

      LOL! I am a strewer about of things too! I recently had to clean up my office for a visit from my brother (my workspace doubles as the ‘guestroom’) and I found I had all these bins and file folders but they were empty. I had been using the bed for ‘filing!’ Of course the engineering mind is very different from mine, I have discovered. Thanks for your comment, Kim.

  2. Vanessa says:

    I love this story and how psychological so much of the writing experience turns out to be.

    • Kecia Adams says:

      That is the truth! It seems like these things just linger in your brain and then something calls them to the forefront and you are able to attach meaning to them. I realized in telling this story that it has shaped my idea of the reward for telling stories for a long time. Thanks for commenting, Vanessa!

  3. journalpulp says:

    That was really good.

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